Earl's intelligence agency career after his army discharge from his own flapping lips

FattMatt

Registered User
Earl talks about his length of army service and his five or six years in a intelligence agency after that, so during his rape trial and up to his first imprisonment.
It's about 11:00 minutes in.

 

Cassano

Registered User
Considering there are ZERO entries in his military record, which would include activities in the Reserves, this is an absolute LIE about him being "part of an intelligence unit" for 5 or 6 years. Since his ETS (or end of active duty) was 1982, he would have still been in the intelligence unit (allegedly) when his first aggravated sexual assault charge was made in 1986. Any assignments in the Reserves would be in the record of military service, as that counts toward DoD credits for VA coverage. There are no entries after 10/07/1982. At the very least, his Reserve unit would be listed, as well as his MOS (military occupational specialty), which, if intelligence, would be a 36F MOS (or something similar). I know. I was a 36F in the 70's.

Also, correcting my own earlier error - his first AWOL was just under a month (about 3 1/2 weeks). The second seems to be over a weekend. I don't think Earl could tell the WHOLE truth if he had a gun held to his head.
 

Starrman72

Staff member
Curator
There is one entry that looks to be a 1 day IRR administrative muster in Pasadena, TX. It is unclear if he was physically required to attend or if it was a paperwork only muster.
 

Cassano

Registered User
There is one entry that looks to be a 1 day IRR administrative muster in Pasadena, TX. It is unclear if he was physically required to attend or if it was a paperwork only muster.
Yeah, the system of record-keeping back then has improved a great deal with the introduction of computers. Hand written records were a pain and hard to decipher these days.

I believe that would have been an ETS muster to end his Ready Reserve status, which ran from 10/09/82 to 02/12/85. Notice that the entry for 10/09/82 says RCPAC St. Louis. That's the former designation for NPRC (National Personnel Records Center). This means his active duty ended on that date and his records were retired to St. Louis, MO. His Ready Reserve was non-reporting / non-duty, so he had an ETS muster (paper only) to formally discharge him out of Pasadena, TX, since he resided in Texas.

So, for the record EARL - - - (LOL) - - - any "secret intelligence work" done for the Army after active duty would only have been 2 years and 4 months, not 5 or 6 years. At any rate, that would be included in the records which it is not.
 

JOHN Q CITIZEN

Registered User
Yeah, the system of record-keeping back then has improved a great deal with the introduction of computers. Hand written records were a pain and hard to decipher these days.

I believe that would have been an ETS muster to end his Ready Reserve status, which ran from 10/09/82 to 02/12/85. Notice that the entry for 10/09/82 says RCPAC St. Louis. That's the former designation for NPRC (National Personnel Records Center). This means his active duty ended on that date and his records were retired to St. Louis, MO. His Ready Reserve was non-reporting / non-duty, so he had an ETS muster (paper only) to formally discharge him out of Pasadena, TX, since he resided in Texas.

So, for the record EARL - - - (LOL) - - - any "secret intelligence work" done for the Army after active duty would only have been 2 years and 4 months, not 5 or 6 years. At any rate, that would be included in the records which it is not.

Earl's military records (part one) has a second date of service, NOV 29, 1987 listed on it. If he was discharged from his reserve duties in 1985 why would there be a service date for 87. This date is confusing me so any info would be helpful.
 

Starrman72

Staff member
Curator
Earl's military records (part one) has a second date of service, NOV 29, 1987 listed on it. If he was discharged from his reserve duties in 1985 why would there be a service date for 87. This date is confusing me so any info would be helpful.
That is confusing. By then of course he was already convicted of Agg Sex Assualt. His time is accounted for in the Houston area from his EAS in 82 through 86 when he was convicted the first time. There was no additional actual time in service in my opinion. The second document is more comprehensive as the individual station entries are entered contemporaneously and less prone to errors than the summary which is generated at the time of the FOIA. The only legitimate reason I can think of for the late entry would be if they held him over administratively while the charges were being resolved which isn’t unheard of since they were filed prior to the end of his IRR commitment.
 

JOHN Q CITIZEN

Registered User
The only legitimate reason I can think of for the late entry would be if they held him over administratively while the charges were being resolved which isn’t unheard of since they were filed prior to the end of his IRR commitment.
[/QUOTE]

That would make sense, Thanks for the response.
 

Cassano

Registered User
The only legitimate reason I can think of for the late entry would be if they held him over administratively while the charges were being resolved which isn’t unheard of since they were filed prior to the end of his IRR commitment.
That would make sense, Thanks for the response.
[/QUOTE]
It appears he had an 8 year commitment (roughly) with 3 years active and 5 years IRR (Individual Ready Reserve). The DoD has to count all that time toward potential retirement credits and VA eligibility for service during certain times that might include theaters of conflict (i.e., Viet Nam Era, Iraq Era, etc.). Therefore, he was NOT active duty during that time but subject to recall in the event of armed conflict. His official separation from active duty was October 8, 1982. From then until November 29, 1987 he was a civilian but still under military recall status.

I've actually never heard of IRR being longer than active duty. Usually, it's the same period of time (i.e., 3 years) as the active duty term. When calculating dates, you have to realize that the clock stops when he's AWOL (the two times), so that would extend any ETS or final separation date beyond actual calendar time that it would be had there been no interruption of his active duty status. DoD does not give service credit for AWOL time.
 

Subscribe

New Threads

Featured Video

Members online

No members online now.
Top