POSTER 7 and PHOTOGRAPHY: The reality, not the blather.

S.SaulGood

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As often seen in 1A audit videos, a review of poster 7's photographic guidelines will occur. Usually an auditor will direct police to the section and instead of just letting them read the paragraph, attempt to distract them, reading it to them, stopping abruptly after the word "corridors". If you keep reading past this point, it becomes obvious as to why the auditor's effort to distract intensifies at this point because the rest of the paragraph makes it perfectly clear that at any time, IF the auditor(s disrupt the smooth flow of postal business, the postmaster has the authority to restore order by telling them, in no uncertain terms, to get the *advertiser censored* out. And if they refuse, police can and will be called and they will be trespassed. Here it is. Anyone with a basic understanding of the English language should be able to easily interpret it without any confusion whatsoever to the meaning of the guideline.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Photographs for News, Advertising, or Commercial Purposes


Photographs for news purposes may be taken in entrances, lobbies, foyers, corridors, or auditoriums when used for public meetings *except where prohibited by official signs or Security Force personnel or other authorized personnel* or a federal court order or rule. Other photographs may be taken only with the permission of the local postmaster or installation head.
_______________________________________________________________________________

A USPS postmaster, or an assistant acting as a postmaster, would qualify as "authorized personnel".
 

S.SaulGood

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Of interest is the wording, "when used for public meetings". The way this is worded can only be correctly interpreted one way. Photography is allowed in the post office foyers, corridors and lobbies ONLY when those designated areas are being used for a public meeting. A public meeting is not the same as meeting the public. And official meetings inside a post office can only be called by officials, public or otherwise.

By the clearly stated language of poster 7, photography is not allowed inside the post office, except to record a public meeting, whether the postmaster or acting postmaster gives their blessing or not.
 

JJTpa

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"Auditoriums when used for public meetings" is the wording. They're obviously only referring to auditoriums being used for public meetings. Who ever heard of holding a public meeting in an entrance or corridor? "Other photographs" then refers to photography in areas other than those listed.
 

S.SaulGood

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"Auditoriums when used for public meetings" is the wording. They're obviously only referring to auditoriums being used for public meetings. Who ever heard of holding a public meeting in an entrance or corridor? "Other photographs" then refers to photography in areas other than those listed.
They did that at larger post offices a hundred years ago and before.

So what do you think about the postmaster, by virtue of the following, being able to call a halt to filming in the post office? Curious, because I've already spoken to USPS in Washington DC about it, and it'll be interesting to see if YOUR take on this matches THEIR interpretation, sine I assume that YOU do NOT have authority to make and interpret postal policy as they intended it and they do.

*except where prohibited by official signs or Security Force personnel or other authorized personnel* or a federal court order or rule. Other photographs may be taken only with the permission of the local postmaster or installation head."
 

JJTpa

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A hundred years ago... ok, no comment on that.

If "authorized personnel" included the postmaster or an assistant, as you say, when would a federal court order ever be necessary? To add a limited exception to the Constitutional right, perhaps?

And why would the next sentence clearly spell out needing to ask the local postmaster's permission for photographs taken in other areas besides those listed? Does this imply nobody above the local postmaster is permitted to provide that kind of permission? Of course not. Be reasonable. It means those are the only areas permission is needed for a photographer to access.

Regarding your comment about calling the police and having someone trespassed, unless the Post Office has an agreement called a Memorandum of Understanding set up with the local police, they do not have jurisdiction on federal property. That would be under the purview of the Postal Inspectors.
 

salex

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Apr 30, 2022
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Poster seven says: “Nothing contained in these rules and regulations shall be construed to abrogate any other federal laws or regulations or any state or local laws and regulations applicable to any area in which the property is situated.”

And, per the Operational Readiness Order HQ-ORO-002-2018 Photography and Videotaping Federal Facilities, page 3: (AKA 2018 Homeland security memo) ”the public is allowed to photograph interior building entrances, lobbies, foyers, corridors and auditoriums from publicly accessible areas.”

So, since the post office is a federal building, and the 2018 DHS memo says interior photography is ok…
 

TheOneTrueRobb

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Jan 4, 2022
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Something else not mentioned: Any facility, private or public, has the right to Trespass ANYONE, for any reason, if they feel that the person is not following rules or guidelines, or is being disruptive. The facility decides what "disruptive" is. In the case of a Post Office, it's the Postmaster's call, or, if the Postmaster isn't available, the highest ranking employee.

That's it. It ain't Rocket Surgery. Come into a Post Office, or any public or private establishment, wielding a camera and a rotten attitude, and the cops can come and trespass you. Hopefully Immediately.

Game over, you lose Fraudhole...
 

Neko

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Aug 8, 2022
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Poster seven says: “Nothing contained in these rules and regulations shall be construed to abrogate any other federal laws or regulations or any state or local laws and regulations applicable to any area in which the property is situated.”

And, per the Operational Readiness Order HQ-ORO-002-2018 Photography and Videotaping Federal Facilities, page 3: (AKA 2018 Homeland security memo) ”the public is allowed to photograph interior building entrances, lobbies, foyers, corridors and auditoriums from publicly accessible areas.”

So, since the post office is a federal building, and the 2018 DHS memo says interior photography is ok…
funny how you missed page 2 which that section falls under.

Except where security regulations, rules,orders, or directives apply or a Federal court order or rule prohibits it, persons entering in or on Federal property
may take photographs of: c) Building entrances, lobbies, foyers, corridors, or auditoriums for news purposes.
It's like auditors and their followers are illiterate or deliberately dishonest.
 

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